Adventure · Travel

Rodeo revamp 2018

 

With S’mores, horseback rides, barrel racing, mutton bustin’, hot air balloon rides, firepits and live music, the COS Rodeo bring lively images of what the magic of the world looked like as a child…

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As a young adult….

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And as those who will always remain young at heart. Treasuring the simple, beautiful things about life and the magic it holds….

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A big thank you to everyone who came out and participated in our 2017 rodeo. COS Rodeo 2018 renews the spirit June 20th with the same exciting layout. Western Wednesday’s wouldn’t be the same without the amazing people who participate and attend!

-The Adventures Out West team

Adventure · Travel · Uncategorized

PIKE SUMMITS HIS NAMESAKE PEAK FOR 2006 BICENTENNIAL

Colorado Springs: After 200 years of trying Zebulon Montgomery Pike has finally succeeded in climbing Pikes Peak, with a little help from his friends at Adventures Out West. Pike took part in this year’s bicentennial celebration by taking a Jeep Tour up the once un-scalable mountain. Pike commented on how professional his cowboy driver was, and is quoted as saying “This view is amazing, could their be another like it?” to which the unnamed cowboy said “Yep, you should see it from one of our hot-air balloons.” Well Pike still being the adventurer agreed that he would have to try flying now that he conquered Pikes Peak.
The morning of Pike’s flight he was understandably nervous considering that he had never flown in anything before. The pilot and crew eased Pike’s fears with their humor and knowledge of the balloon system and the weather. The last time he was upon these plains he was lost and hungry on a yearlong expedition of the west. Once airborne Pike marveled at the views of his “little” mountain and was moved to tears by a dream now realized, and that dream was to see the top of Pikes Peak. Now he had not only stood on the top, but he could also now see the top from his bird’s eye view from the basket. Although Pike was fascinated by the views of the peak he also could not help but marvel in the scenery and wildlife that was directly below him.
When asked if he had a good time on his trip Pike responded “This trip to Colorado Springs in my opinion is every bit as memorable as my first trip 200 years ago, but this trip has been made special by the pilot, crew, and tour drivers of Adventures Out West!”

Adventure · Travel · Uncategorized

NEW AND IMPROVED CARRIAGE MUSEUM

Julie Penrose, widow of entrepreneur Spencer Penrose who built the BROADMOOR in 1918, built the Carriage Museum in 1941. The Museum features the many carriages that Mr. And Mrs. Penrose collected throughout their lifetime. El Pomar Foundation operates this prominent historic resource in keeping with the Penrose commitment to preserve and promote the regions history and heritage. The Museums extensive collection contains 33 horse-drawn carriages and five motorized carriages, including three Pikes Peak Auto Hill Climb race cars (circa 1920’s), Mrs. Penrose’s 1928 Cadillac limousine, and 1906 Renault.
Among the exhibits are two presidential carriages, including an 1841 Williamsburg Brougham used for the inauguration ceremony of William Henry Harrison, the 9th President of the United States. The other presidential carriage, an 1862 “C” Springs Victoria, belonged to the 21st U.S. President, Chester A Arthur.
Museum doors re-opened to a brand new 8,500 square foot facility adjacent to Broadmoor Hall. Several new exhibits are featured, along with a Broadmoor casino table, authentic Native American artifacts, antique firearms and collection of vintage riding tack-saddles, harnesses and stirrups. The Museum is open to the public and free of charge.

Adventure · Driver Stories · Travel · Uncategorized

The Last Stretch of Gold Camp Road Isn’t Boring

Coming north along Lower Gold Camp Road from Helen Hunt Falls, there are lots of thrilling vistas to see. Eventually, however, you get back to paved road and then cross over Bear Creek Road at the northern end of High Drive. From there it’s only a short way over to 26th Street. The views may not be so great along this brief segment of Gold Camp, but the geology – if you’re into that sort of thing – is fascinating.

First, just a few yards past Bear Creek, is the overflow parking lot for Seven Bridges hiking trail. Here, nuggets of Pikes Peak granite are piled up just across the road. Given its pink microcline feldspar, its large crystals, and its various mineral inclusions, this rock is unique to the region – and therefore, because you can also get it so cheaply, it would make the perfect souvenir of your visit for yourself or a relative.

Next, just past the trail head for Seven Bridges, you’ll see a ravine on the left where, if you look carefully, you can see that rocks of granite mingle with rocks of sandstone. At this point you’re passing over the tail end of the Ute Pass Fault, one of the major factors in our local terrain. This dramatic change in geology becomes apparent a few yards farther on, where you pass through an impressive hogback of Dakota Sandstone from the Late Cretaceous, so within a hundred yards you’ve jumped from 1.1 billion-year-old granite to 100 million-year-old sandstone.

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Finally, almost to 26th street, at Pullout # 1 of Lower Gold Camp you can see an impressive wall of sand and limestone a few feet to the west. If the light is right (best in the morning), you can see the ripples of an ancient seafloor at the southern edge of this wall, plus another small patch of ripples about ten feet to the north. This is the beginning of the Western Interior Waterway which covered the area in the Late Cretaceous. It was the shallow ocean of this period that created those ripples in the sand. Near the ripples are also raised tracks that look like those made by sea-worms. A few more feet to the north of the ripples you can see (but only if you get out and walk up close to the wall) the embedded fossil of an ammonite. It’s pretty much worn away now, but you can still make out the spiraling chambers of the shell, which are like those of its modern relative, the nautilus. Finally, to the right of the ammonite fossil are layers of whiter limestone which were deposited here during times of deeper water at the end of the dinosaur age.

-Whipper

Adventure · Travel

How to be a thrifty traveler

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Chihuly Glass Gardens, Seattle WA. Emmalee Mason, 2017.

 

I’ve met a lot of people who think if you travel a lot you must be swimming in cash and extra time, but this certainly isn’t the case in my experience.

I recently spoke to an old friend who traveled to Dublin Ireland from Colorado Springs for $200 round trip. I was shocked to hear this because just a few months ago I paid almost $300 just to go from Denver to Las Vegas (a terrible deal. If you go at the right time you can get round trip for $80).

So how did my friend get tickets to fly oversees for dirt cheap? Kayak.com during black Friday is the secret reveal for that swipe.

Traveling on a budget does require some research and flexibility – and sometimes you have to be willing to drop certain things.

For example, when I went to Seattle I spent an unholy amount of money on seeing the space needle and going to Chihuly glass gardens, but this was something in my mind that I absolutely needed to do, so I made time for it. I’ll almost always save expenses for visiting big attractions or going on a tour that covers a wide area. I make up for this by mainly eating snacks throughout the day and not a lot of huge meals.

In my mind seeing the local attractions and hidden spots are much more important than local food – I know a lot of people who are the opposite.

Financially restricted travels always flows smoother if you plan your time ahead. That way you aren’t stuck in an unfamiliar city with no idea what to do because you’ve run out of money. I get being spontaneous and finding local spots when you talk to people, but leaving your entire trip unplanned is a great way to spontaneously spend a lot of cash.

Whenever I speak to anyone visiting Colorado Springs who is unsure of what to do, I always recommend taking a jeep tour on their first day. That was they get a good overview of the historic locations, history of the town, and get to see Garden of the Gods all in a few hours. Then from here they can take things they learned about in their tour (from their local guide) and fill the rest of the day walking around town, going to museums, shops, or getting great local food.

If you are lucky enough to have a non-financially restricted vacation then hey, ever been on a balloon flight?

~Firefly

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